An Explanation of Your Rights As An Employee


An Explanation of Your Rights As An Employee

Employment law is one of the most rapidly changing fields in the legal sector, so it is important that employees do what they can to say up to date on their rights so that they can pursue relevant action in cases where said rights are violated.
All employees have rights, some of which are statutory while others are contractual. Here we will examine both so that you have a better understanding of your rights under current employment law.
Statutory Rights
Statutory rights are granted to all employees, regardless of whether they work full or part-time, and are given by state law in the United Kingdom. There are a number of examples of statutory employment rights, with some only becoming valid after you have worked for an employer for a certain amount of time. Some of these rights include:
• Flexible working hours where appropriate.
• A maximum 48-hour working week.
• Protection from discrimination in the work place.
• To be provided with a notice in cases of dismissal, assuming you have been an employee for more than one month.
• A written statement that lays out the terms of your employment within two months of starting work.
• An itemised pay slip that makes you away of all tax and National Insurance removed from your pay.
• Protection from unlawful deductions from your pay.
• The right to be paid the current National Minimum Wage.
• The right to maternity, paternity, ante natal and holiday pay.
There are also some rights that you will have once you have worked for your employer for more than two years, including:
• The right to redundancy pay.
• Compensation in cases of unfair dismissal, which will often require legal proceedings.
Most people have the right to file a claim against your employer if any of the above are violated in any way. However, those who work as freelancers or as part of an agency may not share the same rights as a regular employee.
Furthermore, there are also some employees, such as those in the armed forces or police, who may not receive their full rights.
Contractual Rights
In addition to your statutory rights, you may also be granted a number of rights through your contract of employment. These will invariable be in addition to your statutory rights and will be relevant only for the employer that has offered you the contract.
However, in some cases, a contract may also limit your rights. For example, you can sign a contract that states you are willing to work above the maximum 48 hour work week. This is why it is important to check any contract you are offered before you sign.
It is also worth noting that these contract terms don’t always need to be in writing, though they usually are.
If you are unclear about any aspect of your contract, you should speak to your employer to get clarification. However, if you have any more questions about employment law and your rights as an employee, please don’t hesitate to contact Fadiga & Co. Our team will be happy to arrange a consultation and provide all of the advice that you need.